Dog in flowers at 9th Avenue Vet,Walmer, Port Elizabeth

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Physical Address

23 9th Avenue, Walmer, 
Port Elizabeth, South Africa, 6070


041 581 4394/5


041 581 2161


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Consulting Hours

08:00-10:45 by Appointment
15:00-18:15 by Appointment

08:00-12:45 by Appointment

Sunday/Public Holidays:
 09:00-10:45 by Appointment

Emergency Hours:
By  Appointment (SAVA-surcharge applicable)


It is advised to deworm your pets every three to four months, and always deworm all of them at the same time. If you are able to see the worms it is advised to deworm immediately and then again in two weeks time.


Vaccinations in Dogs:

We recommend vaccinating your dog yearly. Your dog will be vaccinated against Rabies, Canine Parvovirus, Canine Distemper, Canine Adenovirus (Canine Hepatitus), Canine Leptospirosis as well as Canine Caronavirus. 


Vaccination in Cats:

As with dogs, we recommend vaccinating your cats on a yearly basis. In cats we vaccinate against the Feline Leukemia Virus, Rabies, Feline Panleucopaenia, Feline Respiratory Disease (Feline Snuffels), Feline Rhinotracheitis and Feline Calici Virus.


How often should I treat my pet for ticks/fleas?

It is recommended to use flea and tick control measures every three to four weeks.


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I found a loose stool with blood and what looks like jelly on the kitchen floor this morning - what do I do?

Acute and Chronic colitis in dogs and cats

What is Acute Colitis?

Acute colitis is a common condition in pets and is characterised by a sudden onset colonic inflammation with a diarrhoea that may contain mucous and/or fresh blood.

Clinical signs

The most common symptoms are straining when defecating, mucous (the jelly you noticed) and/or blood in the stool, and increased frequency of defecation. Systemic signs of illness are generally absent and most animals are still alert, active and have normal appetites in spite of having colitis.

Is Tick Fever and Tick Bite Fever the same disease in dogs?

Erlichiosis (Tick bite fever) in dogs

It is not. Tick fever or Babesios in dogs, is not the same disease as Tick bite fever or Erlichioses. Both diseases are transmitted to dogs by ticks, but they are caused by two totally different organisms or parasites and the clinical signs, progress and treatment are very different.

To further confuse the matter, Tick Bite Fever in humans is not the same as Tick Bite Fever in dogs and once again, although transmitted by ticks, is caused by a complete difference parasite. Tick Bite Fever in dogs is not transmissible to humans or vice versa.

What do I feed my dog, how much and when?

Nutrition in dogs: guidelines to a well-fed pooch

Feeding your dog an appropriate well balanced diet for its life stage is vital to good health and wellbeing. Nutrient requirements differ depending on the breed and age of the dog and there are a few important factors to take into consideration.

Many people see dogs and cats as a similar kind of animal and therefore it is useful to understand the difference between the two species to better understand how to feed your dog properly.

My dog's stomach is suddenly very bloated and he is very uncomfortable

The dreaded Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) Syndrome - Twisted Stomach

Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus (GDV) is a rapidly progressive life-threatening condition in dogs characterised by bloating and twisting of the stomach. Patients admitted with suspected GDV are treated as an emergency as the condition is life threatening. Treatment may require medical and surgical intervention. It is commonly associated with large or giant breed, deep-chested animals between 2 and 10 years of age. Some breeds affected are German Shepherds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Great Danes, Dobermans, Irish Setters and Basset hounds but any breed and age can be affected.

My pet was hit by a car on its hindquarters

Pelvic Fractures

This article gives a simple overview of what to expect when a pet has a pelvic fracture, what are the most common causes and associated injuries, and what treatment options are available.

Pelvic Fractures are a fairly common occurrence and it is something veterinarians in private practice are faced with almost on a weekly basis. The pelvis is an essential part of a pet’s skeletal structure and forms the framework around which their hind limbs move and function. Not only is it essential to our pets ability to walk but there are some very sensitive and important structures that lie in and around the pelvis which can easily be damaged in the event of a pelvic fracture. This will be explained in more detail later on in the article.

Can spaying your dog save her life?

Pyometra in dogs - the reason for spaying

Pyometra is a condition of unsterilised females, usually older than 6 years of age. “Pyo” refers to pus, and “metra” to the uterus. Litterally translated, it would mean “bad of pus”. It is a very serious condition and if left untreated for too long, can have deadly consequences. It can be treated very effectively if caught early and taking your animal to the vet when signs first appear can save its life.

Do animals also get cataracts?

Cataracts in dogs

Have you ever wondered if animals are also affected by cataracts just like humans? The answer is, YES, as with most human diseases and conditions, animals are also affected by this condition. In this article we will look at how dogs are affected by cataracts, what causes it, the prevention and treatment, and the consequences if left untreated.

What is a cataract?

The lens is the structure within the eye that enables us and animals to see far and near and to focus. A cataract is an opacity within the lens or lens capsule which reduces the passage of light through the lens that can affect vision and will eventually cause blindness. Cataracts prevent light from reaching the nerve centre of the eye, known as the retina. A cataract may start as a small cloudiness within the lens that gradually enlarges as it matures. It is very difficult to predict the progression of the cataract but it most often results in blindness. 

Can my kitten make me sick?

Cat Scratch Disease

There are many diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. These diseases are called zoonotic diseases. Although the list below is by no means comprehensive, some of the more common diseases that we can get from our household pets are:

  • Ringworm, which is a fungal infection of the skin
  • Hook worm, roundworm and tapeworm infection
  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Cat scratch disease
  • Scabies, a mite that causes severe itchiness and skin lesions

In this article we are going to look at cat scratch disease (CSD), the cause of it, the symptoms and how to prevent it. Cat scratch disease, or cat scratch fever, is caused by an organism called Bartonella henselae or formerly called Rochalimaea henselae. It is a small anaerobic (organism which does not need oxygen to survive), gram-negative, non-motile bacterium. Domestic cats are the natural hosts for this organism and the animal from which humans can contract the disease (also known as the vector). If a cat harbors this bacterium, the cat very rarely shows any signs of the disease which is described as asymptomatic. It is therefore impossible to tell if a cat is infected with this organism without further testing. Fleas are the organism responsible for transmission of the disease between cats and therefore flea control is one of the best ways to prevent this disease. The infection rate is much higher in a population of cats that are flea ridden and can be as high as 61%. As a cat scratches and bites at fleas, the organism gets stuck between their teeth and under their nails. Kittens younger than 12 months are 15 times more likely to carry the infection than adult cats.

My dog did not go out of the yard and is now limping lame on one of his hind legs

Anterior cruciate ligament rupture in dogs

Often time vets are confronted with this situation in veterinary clinics. As far as the owner knows their dog would not have been subject to any trauma, yet they can hardly take weight on one of their back legs. There are many possible causes but by far one of the most common reasons for this situation occurring is a tear of the major small ligament inside the knee.

My dog is scooting on its backside and I think it has worms

Anal sac disease in dogs

Many veterinarians are presented by concerned pet owners about the animal’s scooting or dragging their backsides along the ground by holding the back legs up in the air and pulling themselves forward by the front legs whilst remaining in a seated position. The owner often thinks that the animal may have worms and is trying to get the worms out their backside by dragging it along the ground. Although this is quite possible to be the case, especially in the case of tapeworm infestation, it is unlikely to be the cause. The most common cause for this behaviour is uncomfortable anal glands.

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